Weed Legalization in 2017

There are about twenty-six states that legalized weed use. The district of Columbia has also adopted some of the most expansive laws which legalize its use for recreational purposes. Nevada, California, Maine, and Massachusetts are among the most recent states which legalized the use of the weed. In California, adults of over 21 years are allowed to possess at least an ounce of marijuana and can legally grow at least six plants of the same in their homes.

Several states are following suit and now passing laws which allow residents to get hold of the weed for medicinal or recreational purposes. Florida, Arkansas, and North Dakota are working out of their medicinal weed laws to make them effective. In Oregon and Colorado, the legalization is going on smoothly as they prepare a shift in the federal laws which will enforce priorities that will include changes to the weed policy.  At the moment, all marijuana users are considered illegal unless incorporated in the law.

Those opposing the incorporation of the use of weed say that most accidents that occur on the road are due to the drivers being high on marijuana use. But this can be disputed because, the weed can stay inactive in the body for over a long period and it doesn’t automatically add up that, if one tests positive, then they are high on marijuana; it could be that they are no longer using it as at the time the accident happened. With the legalization, millions of dollars have been transferred to the federal reserve system which could have otherwise been used outside there.

Though the weed has been poised as a dangerous drug, if properly used for medicinal value, it is worthy having around because it is going to improve life and make people comfortable when it acts as a suppressant to pain.